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night. that's it for us tonight. "ac 360" starts right now. >>> i'm atika shubert. we . we have breaking news coming in to us. according to the u.s. geological survey, a magnitude 7.3 magnitude earthquake strug off the coast of japan. a tsunami warning has been issued. i know it was felt very strongly there, alex. what can you tell us? >> well, atika, you mentioned some of the details. we were sitting in the office here in our bureau in tokyo, up on the ninth floor of this building. it's hard to describe, you can't really describe the feeling until you're into it. the one thing that grips me, i'm relatively new to living here in japan is the noise more than everything. everything basically shaking violently, our filing cabinets shaking. here's what i can tell you. you mentioned the 7.3 earthquake. a few other details just coming in. there are advisories -- pardon me, i'm looking off my notes. there are advisories for japan, but the pacific tsunami warning center has not issued a further alert beyond that. right now they're keeping it just to japan. we are hearing reports of possibly as m
booker tomorrow night. it should be fascinating. that's it for us tonight. "ac 360" starts now. not trying to take sides. our goal is real reporting, finding out the truth. all calls out hip pock see. this is a baffling case of flip-flopping. this is a story we reported last night and is stranger the more we look into it. it's a long story, but stay with us. on tuesday the senate rejected a u.n. treaty aimed at protecting the rights of disabled people around the world. 125 other countries ratified this, but in the full senate 38 republicans voted no leaving the treaty five votes short of ratification. what we learned today that's interesting is some of these same senators actually supported the treaty before they voted against it. some even pledged their support very publicly. senator roy blunt of missouri was a flip-flopper and kay bailey hutchinson of texas and senator jerry moran of kansas. we asked them all to come on the program and they declined. they're silent on this. senator moran was a co-sponsor of the measure to ratify the treaty. he even put a press release back in
. >> the real threat at the moment is here with us. >> what happened if nothing happens with mark zandi, jackie calmes. >> politically, the speaker is playing with a weaker hand than the president. the pressure is higher on him, and his critics are louder, too. >> just need boehner to go along with raising the rates and that's it. republican party is finished. >> he is selling out our children right now with these massive tax increases, and that's his starting bid. he is saying here is $800 billion, now will you sit down with, us a obama? >> hashtags with names like fire boehner have become popular. still, where the votes get counting, boehner seems to have more room to maneuver than he did in preelection faceoffs. but it begs the question, even if the republican speaker gets a deal, can he get it passed? joining me now is tom cole of oklahoma, martha blackburn of tennessee, thank you both for joining us, and i think that's really the key question that we keep hearing. they'll get a deal -- they'll get something. but it doesn't matter if the two of them get a deal, it matters if the speaker has
. the threats that missiles pose the united states. tonight the story struck a chord with us. anderson starts now. >> good evening. we begin tonight with the looming fiscal cliff. >> tonight, there are signs that maybe, some responsible adult became may prevail. joining me now, what is the latest what are you hearing? >> they are a long way from a deal. they did speak to each other on the phone. this is the first time they talked in a week. i'm told though, that there is no real progress in the negotiations. as you know, president obama insi insists there is no deal to present on the top 2% of earners. >> it doesn't involve the rates going up on the top 2%. all of those americans too get a tax cut on that finramework. in some sense it is a tax cut for all americans. >> bottom line, we are talking today but we are still at stalemate. a phone call is big news between these two. >> we are hearing about senate republicans, what are you hearing, how significant is it. it is significant for a couple of reasons. these three republicans in different ways suggested that they would be okay with what mo
, a bright idea. brought to us by the liberal former governor of vermont, howard dean. a man who brought us the scream heard around the world when reran for president. dean says let's face it, america, tacks need to go up for everyone. now, this might not be what you expect from someone like howard dean. it's certainly not the president's position or the position of most americans. another new poll out today shows that most people like the president's idea of only raising taxes on other people. specifically, the top 2%. the problem is according to the congressional research service, the math doesn't add up. that tax hike would only give $678 billion in additional revenue over ten years, now, remember, we're $16 trillion in the debt. now, if we go with howard dean's idea, that gets us $2.8 trillion or about 17% of our debt. adam davidson is the cofounder of planet money and he did the math. he wrote in "the new york times" a while ago, a set of numbers that has stuck with me ever since that increasing the middle class tax burden 8% would have a bigger impact than taxing millionaires at 100%.
for us tonight. "ac 360" starts now. >>> good evening. it's 10:00 on the east coast and we begin with brooking news on the looming fiscal cliff. for the past few nights we've been telling you about the frustrating lack of progress to avert a deal on automatic tax hikes and spending cuts that kick in less than four weeks from now. poll after poll shows the american people want compromise but there weren't many signs that was going to happen, nothing was getting done. in a cnn/crc poll, 67% said washington officials would behave like spoiled children in the fiscal cliff discussions. only 28% said they would behave like adults. tonight signs that maybe some adult behavior might be prevail and a compromise might be reached. jessica yellen joins us, dana bash and david gergen. what's the latest? >> reporter: they are a long way from a deal, but late today speaker boehner and president obama did speak to one another on the phone. now, this is an important development because it's the first time they've talked in a week about the fiscal cliff. i am told, though, that there was no real p
. it is basically weird. on tuesday, the senate rejected a u.s. treaty aimed at protecting the rights of disabled people around the world. it is modeled on the americans for disability act. 125 other countries ratified it but in the full senate 38 republicans voted no leaving it 5 votes short of ratification. what we learned today is that some of the very same senators actually supported the treaty before they voted against it. some even pledged their support publicly. senator roy blunt of missouri was a flip flopper and kay bailey hutchison and jerry moran of kansas. they all declined to come on the program. they're silent. senator moran was a cosponsor of the measure to ratify the treaty and put a press release back in may proclaiming support for the treaty. i want to show you something else. here's senator moran with former senator bob dole in june. dole, a war veteran, a listening time supporter of disability rights and advocate of this treaty. just before tuesday's vote, he came to the senate chamber, 89, frail in the wheelchair and thought it was that important to be there. some of the sena
.com/sotu for analysis and extras. if you missed any part of today's show, find us on itunes. just search "state of the union." fareed zakaria is next from here and parts of the united states. >>> this is gps, the global public square. welcome to you around the states and the world, i'm fareed zakaria. we have a very important show. first up, with washington as an impasse, an exclusive conversation with unof america's greatest deal makers. james bake eric former secretary of state, former secretary of treasury, former white house chief of staff on how to stay off the fiscal cliff and on what his party should learn from the last election. >>> next, when the u.s. aimed high in the 1960s, we sent a man to the moon. with a similar effort, we can now cure cancer. that whees the head of the largest cancer center in the world, houston's m.d. anderson says. you want to hear why we're so close to success and yet so far. >>> and merge has lost its numb were one standings in lots of areas from competitiveness to education. the new number one in most cases, a scandinavian country. what is the secret sauce?
kurtz. you can check us out every monday. we're back here next sunday more, 11:00 a.m. eastern. state of union with candy crowley is right now. >>> to recap the past week of activity atop the fiscal cliff, nothing happened. today the search for a sweet spot between the deal the speaker can get from the president and the one he can sell to his bruised party. >> they have put forward an unbalanced plan that actually lowers rates for the wealthiest americans. >> when is he going to take a step towards us? >> republican house speakers tom cole and marsha blackburn. >>> then falling off the fiscal cliff, a tumble that would shake the world with international monetary fund christine lagarde. >>> plus what happens if nothing happens with moody's chief economist mark zandy, jackie comes of the "new york times" and cnn's dana bash. i'm candy crowley and this is "state of the union." >>> politically the speaker is playing with a weaker hand that the president, the pressure is higher on him and his critics are harder too. >> the republican party's finished. >> he is selling out our childr
. >>> thanks for joining us. today, cnn "newsroom" continues with ashleigh banfield. >> nice to see you, everyone. hello. it is 11:00 on the east coast. 8:00 a.m. on the west coast. how far is too far? that question is being asked around the world today as outrage seems to be building over the tragic death of a nurse in britain who was duped by a prank phone call from two australian deejays. both posing as queen elizabeth and prince charles. as you've probably heard by now, they said they were calling to check on the condition of prince william's pregnant wife, the duchess of cambridge, who was being treated at the hospital for acute morning sickness. we now have a photo of the nurse who committed suicide. it's being released by the london police. she was the one who took the call and passed that on to catherine's ward and another nurse released confidential information on catherine's condition. the station aired the recording of the call on tuesday and on friday, this nurse was found dead after apparently a suicide. the deejays are you off the air. they are speaking out saying they are
former football player here. he's used to wrangling people together. all the kids have been together since young children. they canceled their plans to meet for a holiday celebration in new york city, every single one of them came homestead. >> we've all been such good friends such a long time. we all grew up here. and it's so close-knit, this community. everyone kind of has each other's backs and does whatever it can to help each other out. >> we will be leaving newtown to give this small town its streets back. for the residents here to grieve and share together. but we're not going to stop covering this and talking tab in honor of those who died and to make those in power take action to stop anything like this from happening again. "a.c. 360" begins now. >> erin, thanks very much. good evening, everyone. we are live once again from newtown, connecticut. a town where many students returned to school today. schools reopened, of course, with the exception of sandy hook elementary, the school that's now a crime scene. the students of sandy hook will go back to school after the holidays
as a threat. ashleigh, tell us about the emotion that you are seeing. obviously, a lot of people who are -- they are burying their dead. at same time, trying to move on and give their other children a sense of hope in this community. >> one of the things i've been noticing surrounding communities, people from surrounding communities have been coming here to pay their respects, just to be a part of it somehow, show they are with the people of newtown and they support them in their grief. it's almost unbelievable the number of people with tears in their eyes just walking down the street. you can't walk anywhere near i am without encountering someone with a child or two adults walking hand in hand, crying, because they've just dropped off flags or teddy bears or candles or origami or some christmas ornament with the name of a child. we all know it's okay to be walking done street crying. everyone seems to understand. that's what this is all. and i just want to let you know also, there's a cafe i've been frequenting and working in, and i went up to buy a companyl)r o coffee and the woman
to leave the united states senate. senator jim demint joins us live this hour. we'll talk about his decision and new job. and syria's civil war is in a very dangerous perhaps decisive tipping point right now. can the world prevent bashar al assad from using chemical weapons against his own people? i'm wolf blitzer. you're in "the situation room." >>> we begin with president obama taking his battle to extend tax cuts for the middle class into the heart of the middle class suburb today. he visited a family just outside washington, d.c., using their story to dramatize what will happen in just 26 days if he and congress can't make a deal on the so-called fiscal cliff. a source of great concern for so many people, everyone's taxes will go up, will go up if there's no deal. let's go live to our white house correspondent dan lothian. he's on the scene for us over at the white house. how did it go, dan? >> reporter: well, wolf, we've seen the president do this before in the past whenever he's locked in negotiations with lawmakers. he heads out on the road, either goes to a backyard or sits
that because they know they can prevent about -- -- i'm not talking about basic weapons or weapons used in hunting. best of my knowledge, if anyone uses an assault weapon -- an assault weapon in the hunting with the 30-round magazine, i'd be quite surprised by that -- and by the way, if they do, and because of public safety, that should go away, then i believe that should go away. >> public policy didn't see to be particular focus of yours during the first half of your term here -- well, i was wondering if you agree with that observation and if so, why now? >> i think gun safety is -- has been important to our administration and the fact is we are ranked as having the top five toughest laws on guns in the nation. but i will go back to what i said earlier. absent a federal framework -- drill down further into my own personal history. as mayor of stanford, we came to understand that a big percentage of the handguns work their way up from i-95 in states in which there are actually easier gun laws and guns in some cases sold under exceptions to the rule for gun shows. those guns work their
's it for us. thanks for watching. "early start" begins now. >>> new this morning, tanks and personnel carriers stationed outside the presidential palace in egypt, clashes turning deadly overnight. rage at the new leader fears he may become the old leader. we're live from outside the palace in 30 seconds. >>> plus new reports that syria is putting chemical components in bombs. the details, straight ahead. >>> as of this morning for the first time in the history of our country, it is now legal to smoke pot for recreational purposes in a state and we are there for the pot party. good morning, welcome to "early start." i'm christine romans in for john berman this thursday morning. >> i bet you never thought you'd say that, live at a pot party. >>> good morning to you, i'm zoraida sambolin, 5:00 a.m. in the east here. >>> tension has quickly turned to deadly violence in egypt. this morning, tanks and armored personnel carriers are guarding the presidential palace, this is in cairo. it was there last night that supporters and owe points of president mohamed morsi clashed. they hurled rocks and molot
, and rachel grady will be joining us. steve satich, ohio congressman, steve latourette, and ambassador nick burns are our guests this morning. it's thursday, december 6th, and "starting point" begins right now. >>> welcome, everybody. our starting point this morning, some major developments to tell you about in egypt, after angry protests against political moves by the president, mohamed morsi, have turned deadly. tanks, armored personnel vehicles, all stationed outside the presidential analysis cairo. not only are they guarding the palace, they're also keeping apart supporters and opponents of morsi. hundreds of his islamist supporters already taking to the streets in cairo this morning. opponents are gathering not very far away. last night the two sides clashed right outside the palace. the violence killed at least five people. hundreds of other people were injured. opponents are demanding that morsi dial back on those sweeping powers that he has granted himself. cnn's reza sayah is live for us in cairo this morning. what's the latest? >> reporter: soledad, we're getting the first signs t
painful. joining us now, lieutenant paul vance. he's become the face, the spokesman of this investigation. the connecticut state police. lieutenant vance, we're here in your office in middletown, connecticut. i know it must be hard on the journalists so it must be so much more hard on the men and women that work at the connecticut state police. what has it been like? >> it's been a horrible, tragic scene. the initial response was just horrific. the men and woman that risked their lives going in there trying to stop the aggression, trying to stop the shooting and carnage and rescue as many people as they could truly put their lives on the line but even more so, the faculty, the staff, the teachers that tried and did protect many of those children. there's good and bad but our hearts are just simply broken just due to the fact that 26 people died in that building. >> how are the men and women of the connecticut state police, the first responders, how are they doing? >> they are working through this. we provide counseling and employee assistance to them. they are human beings also but we hav
source, howard dean. does the former vermont governor's plan add up? plus, a former u.s. navy sailor charged with attempted espy naj tonight. the alleged benefactor was russia. the war on drugs? have we lost it? let's go "outfront." good evening. a bright idea brought to us by the liberal former governor of vermont, howard dean. the man who brought us the scream heard round the world when he ran for president. yeah! >> dean says let's face it, america. taxes need to go up for everyone. now, this might not be what you expect from someone like howard dean. it's certainly not the president's position or the position of most americans. another new poll out today shows most people like the president's ideas of only raising taxes on other people, specifically the top 2%. individuals making over $200,000 a year or families making over $250,000 a year. the problem is according to the congressional research service, the math doesn't add up. that tax hike would give $678 billion in additional revenue over ten years. remember, we're $16 trillion in the debt hole. if we go with howard dean's ide
heart trouble check the labor. our own dr. sanjay gupta tells us what a new study says about the effects of coated tablets. we'll also hear what happened during in flight emergency during one of the world's newest high-tech planes. i'm wolf blitzer, you're in the situation room. >>> with just 27 days to go until all of us are hit with tax increases, takes it across the board a cut of $55 billion. people have it in their power to avoid the so-called fiscal cliff aren't negotiating, they're not debating right now, so many of them simply leaving town. but there's more going on than meets the eye. let's bring in our senior congressional correspondent dana basch, she has the latest. >> reporter: there's so much political theater around here right now, you could say tickets. one of today's acts was the house leaving. lawmakers streaming out of the capitol hill, racing to their cars to get to the airport and go home. it's a scene you usually see on a thursday afternoon or friday morning, not wednesday at noon. >> good morning. >> house republican leaders told members they're free to leave, beca
that may have contributed to the apparent suicide of this nurse. >> matthew chance for us this morning in london. >>> in washington all eyes on the fiscal cliff, now just 22 days away. with the white house and republican leaders at a stalemate, president obama is hitting the road to rally support for his plan, which would raise taxes for the wealthiest americans. he met yesterday with house speaker john boehner, their first face to face meeting in more than three weeks. today the president will visit a detroit engine factory to rally support from auto workers. the president's meeting with speaker boehner didn't yield a big breakthrough, but the men did manage to agree on one thing, and that is that they will keep their negotiations behind closed doors. the men released this identical statement, saying this afternoon the president and speaker boehner met at the white house to discuss efforts to resolve the fiscal cliff. we're not reading out details of the conversation, but the lines of communication remain open. cnn's dan lothian is at the white house this morning. dan, i guess the fac
you for starting your morning with us. we start with supports, a devastating story here. more details of a second nfl tragedy. jerry brown has been killed in a car accident. he was riding in a car driven by josh brent. police think alcohol was involved, and he says after hitting a curb at a high speed, their car travelled nearly 900 feet. take a listen. >> our officers on scene felt as if alcohol was a contributing factor in the accident, so he was asked to perform some field sobriety tests. based on performance in those tests, along with our officers observations, and the conversations they had with him, he was placed under arrest for driving while intoxicated. >> he has been arrested on suspicion of intoxication manslaughter. a second degree felony charge. he could face a sentence from two to 20 years. a update now, new video released by the kansas city police show jovan belcher hours before he apparently killed his girlfriend and then himself. the first dash cam video you see here shows police catching to belcher. he was not arrested, and he told police he was going to an apartment
washington. if you missed any part of today's show, find us on i-tu s i-tunes, just search state of the union. fareed zakaria gps is next. >>> this is gps, the global public square, welcome to all of you in the united states, and around the world, i'm far reez zakaria, we have a very important show for you today. first up today w washington at an impasse, a conversation with one of america's greetest deal makers, james baker, former secretary of state, former secretary of the treasury, fovrmer white house chief of staff on how to stay off the fiscal cliff and what the party should learn from the last election. >>> next, when the u.s. aimed high in the 1960s, we sent a man to the moon w the same effort, we can now cure cancer, that's what the head of the largest cancer center in the word, m.d. anderson says. >>> and america has lost it's number one standing in lotts of areas, from competitiveness to education, the new number one in most cases a scandinavian country, what is the credit sauce? we'll dig into it. but first here's my take. as we debate whether the two parties can ever
to bring that to you live. >>> nerve agents locked and loaded ready to be used against a syrian people. now, that scenario now a reality. that is according to nbc news. now, it says that syria's military has loaded the component chemicals for the deadly nerve gas into aerial bombs that could be dropped from their fighter jets. i want to bring in paula gorani about this because you have a different take on this. i know there's a lot of breath held. you say that they're not necessarily on that path. >> i believe that there's analysis that is very critical that the assad regime is not getting ready to use chemical weapons in syria, and here's why. because the question we're asking is how real is the threat? not just for syrians, but for the region, because once you start using chemical weapons, loaded in warheads, you are looking at death tolls in the thousands, possibly in the tens of thousands also threatening neighboring countries. syria is geographically very central in the region. now, here are some of the reasons why syria and the assad regime might not be considering the use of chemical
, and so it's really important to us that we can honor that love with each other through marriage. >> the governor signed the voter approved referendum into law on wednesday. >>> those of you in minnesota and the great lakes area, i don't have to tell you that you're getting slammed right now by a major winter storm. it's the most snow in the minneapolis area so far this season, and we're still a week and a half away from the start of winter. 8 inches of snow right now in the twin cities. a few more inches will accumulate there tonight. that storm will bring rain to new england tomorrow. >>> we have more now on those fiscal cliff talks today between president obama and house speaker john boehner. our emily schmidt is in washington. >> reporter: this was a bit of a surprise meeting. it certainly took place behind closed doors, and all we are being told resulted from it came from two separate statements, one from the white house, one from a congressional staffer, and the statements' wording is identical. this afternoon the president and speaker boehner met at the white house to disc
'm saying is i think it has the power to bring people together simpson style. that's it for us. thanks for watching. erin burnett out front starts now. >>> "outfront" next, 27 days away from the fiscal cliff. things are getting silly. octogenarians doing gangnam style. plus, what the united states is planning to do if assad uses chemical weapons against his own people. and 24-year-old amy copeland contracted a deadly flesh eating disease in may. doctors gave her a 1% chance of survival and tonight, she's "outfront" to talk about it. let's go "outfront." tonight, gangnam style. yep, this is how one man sees the fiscal cliff and it's a pretty important man. this is alan simpson. ♪ yep. that maybe the most action the fiscal cliff saw today. here's the scene on capitol hill at noon. yep, people leaving. members of congress leaving washington, heading home on wednesday afternoon. one man left standing was the house speaker and he says i'm not going anywhere. >> i'll be here and i'll be available at any moment to sit down with the president to get serious about solving this problem. >> but
of the second amendment. but i believe it's time for us to move a different direction. >> and the congresswoman who lost her husband in the long island railroad shooting. >>> also, i'll go one-on-one with a gun advocate who said that lawmakers who vote for gun control have blood on their hands. could he be serious? >>> and why the second amendment doesn't say what you think 2 does. >>> plus a class gunned down, a teacher to protect them. main who lost his daughter. >> they believe that because the problem is guns the answer is guns. it's simply ridiculous. >> we'll go inside the mind of a killer. what dr. oz thinks we should do about mental illness. >> i think we need a homeland security approach to mental illness. thirst is "piers morgan tonight." >>> good evening, final farewells today for two more 6-year-olds, victims of the terrible attacks in sandy hook. jessica rekos was a little girl who loved horses and asked santa for cowgirl boots and cowboy hat and james mattioli who asked once how old do i have to be to sing on stage. president obama would support a man to support -- >> he is actual
you for being with us today. i'm carol costello in atlanta. first a small step toward normally in newtown, connecticut. soledad o'brien joins us live. good morning, soledad. >> reporter: good morning to you, carol. as you said, classes resume today for most of the kids in this community, so many wrestling with so much heartbreak, all of the newtown schools except for sandy hook elementary will reopen. grief and the fears of returning students an additional concern. police officers will be at every single school and today the town will lay to rest, the grandmother of charlotte bacon says her 6-year-old granddaughter was a bundle of energy who loved dresses and a second, jessica rekos, loved horses, she wrote her own horse stories, excited about a pair of cowgirl boots she was expecting to get for christmas. now to get the latest on the school's reopening this morning, sara endo is here in the heart of newtown with more. >> reporter: they're starting to see a lot of school buses rolling by and in about an hour or two classes will be in session. they all may be anxious about schoo
in tokyo what can you tell us? >> this happened friday evening b an hour and a half ago. an unnerving scene. a 7.3 magnitude earthquake. as we understand it, this came along the same fault line that triggered that massive tsunami in march of 2011. we have been watching all the local stations, trying to gather all the information we can. here's what we know at this point in terms of a tsunami. we have seen several small waves come in, about four waves. the biggest one being about one meter or about three feet. the other waves were only about 8 to 16 inches. so no sign of a major tsunami at this point. but it is quite unnerving. there are reports of the trains stopping up there, some of the roads being closed. but in terms of injuries and in terms of deaths, we are only hearing reports of a few injuries at this time. you'll remember there was the crippled fukushima plant in between that region and where we are in tokyo according to tepco, the company that operates the nuclear plants in japan, all is fine at this hour. but we are still waiting for the all clear when it comes to the tsunami wav
your morning with us. the weather outside is frightful ♪ ♪ but the fire is so delightful ♪ nothing melts away the cold like a hot, delicious bowl of chicken noodle soup from campbell's. ♪ let it snow, let it snow i have obligations. cute tobligations, but obligations.g. i need to rethink the core of my portfolio. what i really need is sleep. introducing the ishares core, building blocks for the heart of your portfolio. find out why 9 out of 10 large professional investors choose ishares for their etfs. ishares by blackrock. call 1-800-ishares for a prospectus which includes investment objectives, risks, charges and expenses. read and consider it carefully before investing. risk includes possible loss of principal. (announcer) when subaru owners look in the mirror, they see more than themselves. so we celebrate our year-end with the "share the love" event. get a great deal on a new subaru and 250 dollars goes to your choice of five charities. by the end of this, our fifth year, our total can reach almost 25 million dollars. it's a nice reflection on us all. now through january 2nd
happening in syria with the use of chemical weapons. somebody else has a threat of using a similar weapon. as a gun owner. you have to be able to protect yourself. if you are damaged and you are willing to take somebody else's life. that comes down to that person is not going to obey the gun laws. they are going to find a gun or find another weapon. >> stretching and shooting to syria and chemical weapons seems like a bit of a stretch. the implications of that is that every american should have access to chemical weapons and nuclear weapons. it will result in weapons ownership. look at europe and the rest of the world. we are way, way out there. we have the highest murder rate in the world. >> abbey, here is what they say to me. each time it is the same debate and nothing gets done about it. 300 million guns and you have between 11 and 12,000 guns and murders a year. britain has 35 as does germany and australia. to countries that have strict gun kcontrol have little gun murder. i think carole had it right. she said it is about personal responsibility. that is the most important part. it i
to this. >>> god blesses us so why can't we bless other people. >> he returned from the battlefield broken homeless, but things have changed for this iraq war vet. now he's giving back one blessing at a time. you've got to see that. it's december 9, 2012. good morning. i'm susan hendricks in for randi kaye. -- captions by vitac -- www.vitac.com >>> we begin with a developing story, venezuelan president hugo chavez telling the world his cancer is back it's shown up in the same affected area. we have had to look at the diagnostics and check with with a expert and dehave decided it is absolutely essential and necessary to undergo another surgery. >> chavez also spoke publicly about a sec sayser for a first time saying his vice president should replace him if he now worsens. we now go to cubic where patrick joins us. good morning. >> good morning. it was a stunning announcement. it could have major impact on this country as well. since we were told when chavez had been reelected he stated consistently he had been cured of cancer. at that point he had suffered two bouts of cancer and had been c
. his parents used to say he swam like a fish. and loved to visit his grandparents. james also learned to ride his bike. he tried to wear shorts and t-shirts all year round. he loved to use hair gel in order to spike up his brown hair. he was a little boy who looked forward to growing up. he liked to sing at the top of his lungs and would ask how old do i have to be before i can sing on a stage? he also wanted to know when he'd be old enough to order a foot long ham sandwich at subway one of his favorite places. james was born four weeks prematurely, his family used to joke, he came into the world because he was hungry. his parents say he was an early riser, always the first to wake the family up, always eager to start the day. at the end of the day, he loved nothing more than to cuddle up with this mom under a blanket on the couch. james also adored spending time with his dad. in his obituary, he writes, if dad was outside, james liked to be right there with him. their love of one another was one of a kind. james was his dad's mini look-alike. jessica rekos loved everything about hors
. the only reason they're not going to use it is because somebody else, the u.s., has a similar threat of using a similar weapon. as a gun owner, you have to be able to protect yourself. if you are damaged and you are willing to take somebody else's life. that comes down to that person is not going to obey the gun laws. they are going to find a gun or find another weapon. >> i've heard of some stretches, in my time. but stretching from javon belcher and the shooting in syria and chemical weapons seems like a bit of a stretch. the implications of that is that every american should have access to chemical weapons and nuclear weapons. it will result in weapons ownership. look at europe. look at japan. look at the rest of the world. we are way, way out there. we have the highest murder rate in the world. it hasn't protected us. it has resulted in arguments that should have a consequence of maybe a slap in the face, resulting in a bullet through the heart. it results in a double-murder in this case, a murder/suicide. guns don't protect. they cause suicide. >> let me bring in -- >> they caus
. a friend of dawn's told us, even little kids know when someone cares about them and that was her. on friday, dawn was in a meeting when she heard the gunshots. she ran out into the hall and died lounging at the gunman trying to protect her school. she died a hero and her friends expected nothing less than her. >> dawn put herself in jeopardy and i have been angry about that. angry until just now, today, when i met two women that she told to go run to shelter while she actually confronted the gunman and she could not have -- she could have avoided that and she didn't. i knew she wouldn't. so i'm not angry anymore. i'm not angry. i'm not angry anymore. i'm not angry. i'm just very sad. >> anne marie murphy also died. she died with her arms wrapped around a 6-year-old boy a. student with special education needs. anne marie was known as a happy soul. she'll be remembered for her love for her outdoors and her husband and four children. in her funeral mass, arch bishop said that her life brought life to a world sometimes beset by wickedness. laur lauren rousseau was 30 years old. her family says
state, this day could not come soon enough. it is day one of legal recreational marijuana use. courtesy of the voters who passed a landmark referendum last month. from this day forward, if you are old enough to drink, you can consume as much as one ounce of pot in washington state but you still can't grow it and you still can't sell it. technically, you still can't buy it and you're not supposed to light up in public either. what are you all doing out there at that party? my colleague was there. he was on the not so mean streets when the law took effect. i'll be interested to find out what the absentee rate is at seattle workplaces today, miguel. >> reporter: i think most people are going to work here. it's not quite as crazy as that. it's cold and rainy. puts a damper on things. there were a lot of parties across the entire state and a lot of those issues you raised will be taken care of in the near future. last night was a night for celebration for these folks. >> four, three, two, one. >> reporter: the moment recreational pot, anything less than an ounce no longer illegal in washingt
, thanks for being with us. actor frankie muniz is here. he had amy know stroke and he's 27 years old. >>> but first consider this. hoarding as a mental illness. "under the microscope." you know, the medical world is buzzing about the knew diagnostic and & statistical manual of disorders, dsm. this so-called bible of mental illness defines what is and what isn't a mental illness. i can't underscore enough what a big deal this could be. they just ratified, for example, many changes, many revisions, based on the latest search. so today i wanted to give you an example of something you may have never thought about or even heard of. hoarding. it now has a category of its own. >> if my mother's unable to clean up the house, i don't know what will happen. we are doing this as a last-ditch effort. she's hit rock bottom. >> gail is the dean and a proffers at boston university of school social work. she's written extensively on hoarding. thanks so much for joining us, professor. appreciate it. >> glad to. >> you know, we all collect stuff. it's the first thing i sort of thought of when i was re
us all the way to the 11th hour and 59th minute. they want to get a break through now and that's encouraging. >> and are their hints they are moving closer together in a deal. we'll talk about that next. list of almost two thousand corporate partners - companies like microsoft, american red cross and adobe - to create options for you. not only that, we're using what we learn from these partners to shape our curriculum, so that when you find the job you want you'll be a perfect fit. let's get to work. i have a cold... i took dayquil, but i still have a runny nose. [ male announcer ] truth is, dayquil doesn't work on runny noses. what? [ male announcer ] it doesn't have an antihistamine. really? [ male announcer ] really. alka-seltzer plus cold and cough fights your worst cold symptoms, plus has a fast acting antihistamine to relieve your runny nose. [ sighs ] thank you! [ male announcer ] you're welcome. that's the cold truth! [ male announcer ] alka-seltzer plus. ♪ oh what a relief it is! ♪ [ male announcer ] to learn more about the cold truth and save $1 visit alka-seltzer
that there will be consequences, there will be consequences if the assad regime makes a terrible mistake by using these chemical weapons on their own people. >> earlier today, leon panetta. we'll have a report from the pentagon on syria in a moment. >>> first, shock waves in washington. a powerful republican senator suddenly calling it quits. south carolina senator jim demint will step down december 31st to lead the heritage foundation. it's a powerful conservative think tank in washington. demint says he can be more effective outside the senate. >> a lot of my role in the senate has been stopping bad things and saying no to bad things. but we need to do more than that and tell americans what we're for. one of the mistakes i think the republican party made the last two years is trying to make obama the issue without sharing with america bold reform ideas that get people inspired to get behind us. >> senator demint, huge tea party supporter. sometimes clashes with his own party's leadership. he is leaving with four years left in his senate term. earlier, he said he'd retire when the term was up in 2017 but gave
the second amendment. i never used the words "gun control." people inferred that. give me bun example of a professional athlete who by virtue of his having a gun took a dangerous situation and turned it around for the better. >> so did bob costas step too far outside the role of a sports analyst? joining me is christine brennan, sports kol oumist and mike wise who writes. christine, simple question. was bob costas out of bounds in proesed his political concerns? >> actually i do not think he was. what i think should have been done is the term kmonltary, howie, should have been put on the screen the way it is for mike wise and me and make it crystal clear that this next 90 seconds is an opinion piece. but i do believe that -- and i know mike feels this way too about columns and sports. sports is a reflection of our society much mar than it is the escape, the sports section. so with that in mind i would say to have these national conversations, whether it be about concussions or domestic violence, which i would make this case, this could have been more about that, whatever it is, steroi
, straight ahead. >>> a packed two hours for you. new york mayor cory booker will join us. and poet journalist, angela davis will join us as well. gold medal olympic gymnast gabby douglas has written a new book. and judy chu is with us, and the macks join us, and singer adam lambert. monday, december 10th. and "starting point" begins right now. >>> wow, that's an ominous little graphic right there. yes that is because the fiscal cliff is what we're talking about this morning. that's the starting point. president obama and the house speaker speaking face to face for the first time in more than three weeks. the two men who stand between millions of americans and the fiscal cliff sat down, had a conversation. a critical development 22 days away from the cliff, which means severe tax hikes and spending cuts unless the two can find a way to compromise. nobody is saying much. but spokesperson says the lines of communication remain open erskin bowles said this. >> you know, they have started to tango now and any time have you two guys in there tangoing, have you a chance to get it done. >>
appear the hour i first believed ♪ >> amazing grace. that does it for us in newtown. erin burnett starts now. >>> "outfront" next, the latest on the investigation into the newtown shootings. and we have new details tonight on the suspected gunman. what we have been learning from his autopsy, from an autopsy of his brain and from a close friend. >>> plus, the hero teacher, vicky soto. what she did for her kids. >>> later, in the face of horror, citizens around the world have come together to make a difference. let's go "outfront." >>> good evening, everyone. i'm erin burnett in newtown, connecticut. "outfront" searching for answers. that's what we've all been doing, trying to understand how this happened and why it happened. investigators in connecticut returned to the home of the gunman. the suspected gunman, 20-year-old adam lanza, searching for evidence. so far, authorities have been unable to retrieve any information from his computer, which was found smashed to pieces in the house he lived in with his mother, nancy. now, investigators have been trying to piece together an expl
to happen. >> raphael romo is joining us. she really was an incredible woman and quite a figure. i mean, she really talked a lot about in very dcandid terms her own personal struggles. >> she was very powerful, and the reason she had so many followers especially among women in the mexican-american community and also in mexico because she was the kind of woman who would say u-you may think you're a big mexican macho, but i can have you eat from my hand in minutes. she spoke about empowering women and spoke about against domestic violence. those themes that resonated with the community, and if you watch an interview, a lot of times there had to be a lot of bleeping because she was not afraid to speak her mind exactly the way she felt about a thin. she was not afraid at all, and that's how she will be remembered, i think. >> i thought it was interesting, too. it was as recently as saturday i read she was talking about experiencing pain and she's like any other woman. she's not any different. tell us how she influenced the audience with her music. >> she married three times and had five children
opposes the -- roll back their rights. michigan and its workers' role in the revival of the u.s. automobile industry is a prime example of how unions have helped build a strong middle class and strong american economy. that has come from matt lairic before the president's speech there. polls show michiganders are torn, divided on this measure. some polls show a little bit of majority support on the effort. but the president is coming down squarely on the side of unions here. and he -- there is leave nothing room for doubt where he stands, brooke. >> that's what we're hearing, what you're getting from the white house today and certainly we don't know, but perhaps the president will mention what is happening not too far away in lansing. let me ask you, jessica, the fiscal cliff is something we have been talked about each and every day here on cnn, the president met with the speaker of the house and am i correct, has it been about a year since the two of them had a one on one face to face, so what are we learning detailwise from the meeting? >> the bottom line is the status appears
? straight to the firehouse? >> straight to the firehouse. from there, we just -- >> help us around the world understand what you, as a first responder, are going through. >> sadness, anger, guilt in some aspects. >> why guilt? what could you have done? >> exactly. we were having counseling. as a group. >> can i get your first and last name? >> name's jeffrey thomas. >> jeffrey thomas. since high school. what do you make of the preeths, ju wreaths, people you don't know sending you all these wreaths to put up in town. what would you say to the people of portland, oregon? >> thank you. it makes us feel warm to know this is -- it is amazing that people that far away care about us. >> two simple words, thank you. and we have also now learned that the u.s. senate, members of the senate, have observed a moment of silence. want to take a moment here, take a look. >> i now ask that the united states senate observe a moment of silence to honor the victims of the sandy hook elementary school tragedy. >> mr. president -- >> majority leader. >> the following remarks -- >> just wanted to share that momen
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